Some books grow on you. this is one of them.

I don’t recall where or how I first came across Wolf Suschitzky, but I do like those photographers who have documented life in the UK over the decades and Suschitzky is one such with a career stretching from the 1030’s into the 21st century. This book, Seven Decades of Photography, published in 2014 when Suschitzky was already 102 years old, collects a selection of images from his long career.

Quite apart from his photography the man himself is fascinating. Born in Vienna in 1912 to a Jewish atheist father who ran a bookshop and later a socialist publishing house. Originally wanting to study zoology, Suschitzky ended up studying photography influenced by his sister Edith, herself a photographer. Observing political developments in Austria in the 1930’s he concluded that Vienna was not a good place for a Jewish socialist and moved to London.

Shortly after arriving he landed a job as a cinematographer, working on documentaries before moving into feature films. Cinematography paid the bills and enabled him to continue with his photography on his own terms. Throughout the book there are portrait shots of some of the actors he worked with as well as animal shots and portraits reflecting his interest in zoology.

The first time I browsed this book I liked many of the images but there were few that really stood out. It was a pleasant browse but not much more. When I pulled the book off the shelf for the first time in almost two years my appreciation of his work was transformed. Now I see many great images and some that are truly outstanding. Perhaps it is just me responding differently after two more years of looking at and thinking about photography, but I think it is also about the photographs. They demand and deserve a lingering look to fully appreciate them, and I don’t think I paid enough attention previously.

What stands out now is Suschitzky’s wonderful use light and strong structural elements, something that was perhaps influenced by his work as a cinematographer. Yet he was happier to be known as a craftsman than an artist, and an observer rather than a creator.

Suschitzky died in 2016 at the age of 104 and the book is an excellent testament to his work. It was originally published by SYNEMA – Gesellschaft für Film und Medien in Austria and unfortunately, like so many photobooks is now out of print and expensive.

LINKS

A short film on Suschitzky from FOTOHOF Gallery in Vienna released as part of their exhibition of Suschitzky’s work, ‘No Resting Place’. You can also take a virtual tour of the exhibition.